Bars, Demonstrations, and Getting Thumped…

Many people believe that they’ll be safe going to bars into the wee hours of the morning. I’m having fun! After all, they’re not looking for trouble and things should be fine. Moreover, some people feel that they can go to demonstrations no matter what it’s about or who the participants are because it’s their right to go. That they’ll be protected by authorities because, after all, this is America.

The fact is that if you go to bars in the early morning hours you have a better chance of getting into a physical altercation or of being assaulted. Booze has been flowing for hours, machismo can be at its peak and inhibitions for malcontents and even sociopaths, have dropped lower than a frogs ass. If you play the odds for long enough, it’s just a matter of time that you’ll get into an altercation of some sort. If you’re good, you may be able to diffuse it or talk your way out of it but there’s the possibility that your inhibitions may be down too and maybe you might just say, hell with it, and boom, a fight starts. Or your diffusing skill simply may not work because of what the alcohol can do to your aggressor. Read the next paragraph and see the crux of the problem for good people:

Booze, Rats and You’re Diffusing Skills

According to an article entitled, ‘A farewell to Bar Fights’ written by Behavioral Neuroscientist Joshua Gowin PhD, “We’ve learned a great deal about alcohol’s effects on aggression by studying rats; they also become mean when drunk. In sober circumstances, rats often resolve disputes peacefully using body language a signal of submission so that an encounter does not become physical. When drunk, however, the aggressor will often ignore submissive cues and proceed to bite the prone rat. Liquored up humans may similarly be blind to social cues that signal an aggressor to calm down, such as conciliatory words or an attempt to diffuse the situation.”  So, even if you might be good at talking your way out of trouble, booze may nullify your skills working on the boozed up aggressor.

How about going somewhere where there’s apt to be violence, like a demonstration? If either side has a record of violence, or the topic of the protest is extremely volatile, be prepared for volatility and be prepared for violence and that also means be prepared for a thumping. That thumping may come from the other side or even from the police if you happen to go with the flow of a crowd that ends up in a shit sandwich even if you’re just there for moral support.

The Shoulds Should go Away

A famous psychologist wrote many years ago about the neurotic ‘shoulds’. That many neurotic individuals live by a code of ‘The Shoulds’. I should not be judgmental. I should not be angry. And perhaps even, I should be able to go anywhere I want to, no matter what.

The fact is that there are steadfast possibilities that can and do occur when we go certain places at certain times. And the fact of the matter also is that it’s perfectly fine to not go to these places because of what may occur. We ‘should’ go when we’ve assessed the consequences for our well-being and when we’re fine with those possibilities. It’s okay to work toward our civic goals differently than going to all demonstrations, or at least the seemingly volatile ones, and it’s certainly fine to stay away from bars during the late hours.

Conversely, it’s alright to go to bars late at night and to volatile demonstrations. What! Ha, yes it is. But know the consequences that are likely to occur and don’t be surprised at the world’s ‘unfairness’ if things get ugly. The ‘world’ is not fair and that’s okay. It is what it is. The world is true. See the truth of your surroundings and act prudently in your favor.

 

Check out Steve’s latest book: http://tinyurl.com/zcbkkyy

Steve Kovacs
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Steve Kovacs

Steve is a bestselling author with his latest book being, 'Protect Your Kids! The Simple Keys to Children's Safety and Survival'. Steve has also written hundreds of articles on a wide variety of topics.

Steve's a three-time survivor of violence in his youth and was an award winning police officer being the recipient of the 'J. Edgar Hoover Foundation' award for Fidelity, Bravery, and Integrity. Steve was SWAT trained by the FBI, FBI Hostage Rescue Team, and the LAPD.

For several years, Steve also did radio political and current event commentary and taught college Criminal Justice. He is the former host of the long running 'The Kovacs Perspective' Internet radio talk show.

Presently, Steve is the owner and Managing Director of one of the oldest martial art schools in Ohio, 'The Mayfield Academy of Self-Defense'.
Steve Kovacs
Follow Steve
Steve Kovacs

About Steve Kovacs

Steve is a bestselling author with his latest book being, 'Protect Your Kids! The Simple Keys to Children's Safety and Survival'. Steve has also written hundreds of articles on a wide variety of topics. Steve's a three-time survivor of violence in his youth and was an award winning police officer being the recipient of the 'J. Edgar Hoover Foundation' award for Fidelity, Bravery, and Integrity. Steve was SWAT trained by the FBI, FBI Hostage Rescue Team, and the LAPD. For several years, Steve also did radio political and current event commentary and taught college Criminal Justice. He is the former host of the long running 'The Kovacs Perspective' Internet radio talk show. Presently, Steve is the owner and Managing Director of one of the oldest martial art schools in Ohio, 'The Mayfield Academy of Self-Defense'.
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3 Responses to Bars, Demonstrations, and Getting Thumped…

  1. Patricia JohnsonPatricia Johnson says:

    It’s a shame Dr. Gowin didn’t list resources for the statistics he’s quoting in his article because they’re interesting. He’s saying 50 percent of murders are committed under the influence, and 66 percent of domestic violence incidents are committed under the influence, yet only 25 percent of individuals become mean after drinking and those that do become mean are usually problem drinkers and/or have a criminal history. That particular article was written approximately seven years ago, and since then he’s been working at the NIH studying the effects of alcohol. I’m curious to see what current research has determined. Fascinating subject.

    When I was young I lived in the inner city and bar hopping in the wee hours of the morning was the thing to do, but that was in a different lifetime when people in this country cared about one another and everyone didn’t have a gigantic chip on their shoulder. There is so much anger in this country that it’s not even safe going to the grocery store in daylight, much less to a bar late at night. It’s truly a scary world out there.

    I do take want to add to your comments on protests. Prior to the start of the Iraq War I went to Washington D.C. to protest. I didn’t go because I felt it was my right to go, I went because I feel so strongly about war and have seen, first hand, the consequences of our jumping into war with another
    country. Physically I’m not able to participate in another protest, but if I was I can guarantee you that if there was another D.C. protest against this country taking military action against others, I would be there.

    I can’t really comment on what others think, but I would guess the majority of protesters, whether for or against a particular subject feel very strongly about the subject, which is why they’re there.

    While we don’t have the right to be protected by the authorities during demonstrations, we absolutely have the right and RESPONSIBILITY to speak out for others when they cannot speak for themselves. That right was given to us by all the men and women that have fought for our freedoms.

    When the protests get out of control due to subject matter, that’s a horse of a different color and all pros and cons need to be carefully analyzed. Protests were never intended to be war zones.

    Pat

    • Steve KovacsSteve Kovacs says:

      I agree that to speak for those who truly cannot speak for themselves is an exception to the rule of laying back in the time of possible peril. I also agree that going to a demo such as about war, can be important but there are many important causes. The thing is though, that to look at them realistically when you go. Know what may happen.

      And actually you do have the right to be protected by the government/police, but, realistically, they can’t do it all and be everywhere during riots and the like.

      And for why people go to demo’s. Of course many go for altruistic reasons. But some go for violence. Some go because it’s cool and the group that they’re socially involved with feels its the ‘soup du jour’ in causes. And some are clueless. They don’t know anything about why they are there other than sound bites that they’ve heard and it’s an event.
      When I was about 19 a friend and I went to a meeting/group get together in the City of Cleveland about paying homage to the great rebel Che Guevara. I went because it was cool, acceptable and the thing to do for young rebel minded young people (rebelliousness can be a good thing for kids). I’m 61 now. I now know he was a thug, murderer and the like, but still to this day, many young people like I did, go to these functions and wear t-shirts with his image and pay homage to him.

      Some people are clueless when they take stands. That’s okay though because in America they have the right to do that and the right to be protected, but I say, know your surroundings and know what you are getting into.

      Be safe…..

  2. Patricia JohnsonPatricia Johnson says:

    Good morning Steve,

    You obviously know more about the subject than I ever will because I’m only familiar with that one demonstration and am sorry to hear that some folks are there just to be with whoever they consider the “in” group.

    Was just reading an article about our DOJ wanting all sorts of information, IP address, contact information, photos, etc., on the 1.3 million that signed up for an anti-Trump site. Sad world we now live in – seems like that sort of action will get more protests. If people break the law when protesting then obviously the authorities have the right to additional information, but otherwise seems like a complete invasion of privacy. Have a good day Steve, Pat

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